Security Due Care – What’s it Worth?

by

As of mid-day on Wednesday the 1st of June 2011 (US time), some recent events reported in print and online venues include:

– The trojan effecting MAC users is eluding the fix Apple supplied
– L-3 Communications is the 2nd known SecurID hack of defense contractor
– More malware has infected Google’s Android marketplace (smartphones)
– Insider theft recently cost BoA $10 million
– Cookie-jacking is a new threat-vector for anyone using IE
– The Playstation breach is estimated to cost Sony $171 million
– More flaws are found in CAPCHA
– Credit processors are being targeted by spammers
– Lockheed Martin suspends remote access after 1st known SecurID hack
– Hacktavists attack PBS over Wikileak-disagreements
– Bank in Australia cancels 10,000 credit cards due to un-named security breach
– Backdoor passwords to networking gear are leaked online
– Pentagon taking stance that cyberware is an attack

A good source for updated information can be found at The Register

And, this is just mid-week: hopefully the back-half of the week will be slower. Whether events are publicly reported or not, the trajectory-of-evidence indicates we in a period of active attacks on targets of opportunity: be these for financial or political reasons. Gone are the days of the script-kiddies pulling a new hack for bragging-rights.

What do High Performance Organizations (HPOs) share in common?

1. The least amount of data theft or loss
2. The fewest problems with regulatory audit
3. The highest levels of business uptime in IT
4. The highest customer attraction and retention rates
5. Revenue and profit levels that define and dominate markets

Security is apparently not easy to do.

But, if you’re not spending enough money on it – then it’s easy to do, because you’re ignoring it.

Just don’t tell this to investors, regulators or attorneys: standards for due-care could be jaw-breakers.

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